Comparison charts – Carvalu.com™ Qualities’ Inventory

Carvalu.com™ Qualities' Inventory



To facilitate rating ease, here is a list of many of the SUV properties we included in our analysis of the eight telescoped classifications. These features are sometimes followed by relevant capsulized descriptions of what each such sub-attribute does.
You will find a list just like this nowhere else.
Our patented and patent pending system is the only one that calculates respective monetary values of distinctions based not necessarily on their particular respective costs, but founded rather on the calculated value of what various properties in fact do for the driver. It is the true monetary importance of the function, not what you have to pay for it that is considered.
Explanation:
Most of us don’t want to pay a lot of money for a feature that is expensive to manufacture but for which we have little use, but will gladly pay extra dollars for a very useful accessory.
The more quantified, predigested, analyzed, true information we have about SUVs, the easier it is to choose. Rival buying guides give you unquantified and partial reprints of manufacturers’ specs and government stats, individual reviewers’ unavoidably biased opinions, and/or results of irrelevant and meaningless popularity contests. Non-Subjective Valuing® can make you an instant, ideal SUV expert in your very own terms.
Few of us want to pay for a costly promotional campaign, expensive commercials, unreasonably high labor, import, sales or shipping costs, and/or a manufacturer’s CEO’s $5,000,000 bonus, for that matter.
We want to pay for what an SUV in fact is, has and does, period. For that information, consumers, dealers and manufacturers alike found the correct web site.

PLEASE SCROLL DOWN

Qualities’ Inventory.
Copyright ©1988-2009 Tommy Vig

1. PERFORMANCE

Includes at least some or all of the following:

Aerodynamics
(More than just appearance, gas mileage is affected by aerodynamic
resistance)
All wheel drive
(The four wheels are continuously, simultaneously powered.
Generally the safest and best system, however it adversely
affects gas consumption and is more expensive to repair)
Alternator
(Quality, amps, etc., for instance higher amp number means more
power for your electronic and related equipment)
Axel ratio
(Higher means more power and speed)
Bore
(Piston cylinder circumference)
Cam configuration
(Overhead, single, dual, quad, etc.)
Compression ratio
(Higher ratio means elevated engine output which is better)
Continuously Variable Transmission
(Saves fuel but of unproven reliability)
Coolant capacity
(In quarts, larger is better)
Cylinders
(Pistons travel and combustion occurs in them,
more number usually means bigger power)
Diagnostic plug
(Generally faster/easier/more convenient expert detection of
mechanical problems)
Displacement
(In cubic inches, relates to engine size. Bigger means more
powerful and contributes to faster speed.)
Driveability/Handling
(Including cornering, responsiveness, etc.)
Hauling/Towing Power/Capacity
Engine type/quality
(SOHC single overhead cam: more power; DOHC, dual overhead cam:
even more power; V is more compact than inline; horizontally
opposed are good for lower engine heat and lower center of gravity;
oil cooler, max recommended rpm [redline], mounting,
location [longitudinal/transverse], material, layout, etc.)
Engine size
(Bigger is smoother and more powerful)
Engine speed
(Crank shaft rpm)
Fan
(Blades number, etc.)
Four Wheel Drive
(Better off road and during bad driving conditions,
but not as good on the freeway in clear weather.)
Four Wheel Steering
Fuel delivery system
(Incl. various [electronic] fuel injection systems, such as
programmed, sequential, port, multi-port
[one for each cylinder].
Eliminates the need for a carburetor which generally means
better control and gas mileage.)
Fun
(We spend a lot of time in our cars.
Enjoying the experience is a
greatly valuable asset.)
Gear ratios
(Influences gas mileage)
Horse power
(The more the better)
Interior and exterior layout and quality
(Including carpets, color coding, etc.)
Limited slip differential
Maximum allowable weight
(Important if you travel a lot with a
large family/luggage/trailer, etc)
Off the mark, top and passing speeds
(Important safety factors)
Off-road ability
Overdrive
(Increases gas mileage on freeways)
Overhead Cam
(Better engine response)
Parking ease
Power to weight ratio
(Affects performance.)
Pride of Ownership
Radiator thickness & quality
(Larger size is more advantageous in extreme climates,
increasing both heating and cooling capacity)
Slalom
(Moving in and out of traffic ability, a safety factor.)
Spoiler
(Mostly cosmetic, but in a few cases makes for
better road holding and gas mileage)
Stroke
(The distance the piston moves)
Starter
(Cold cranking, etc.)
Supercharger (Turbo)
(Increases engine power)
Torque (measured in pounds/feet: indicating
relative engine strength)
Torque converter
(Improves starting speed)
Traction control
(An important safety factor)
Trailer hatch
Transmission
(Automatic, overdrive with lock up, 3,4,5 or 6 speed,
reverse, oil cooler, etc.)
Turbo-charger
(Increases engine power)
Turning Cycle
(Curb to curb or wall to wall: we used the former to
simplify comparability)
Valves per cylinder
(The more valves, the better acceleration,
12, 24, 32, etc.)
Variable timing and lift
Wheel composition
(Aluminum alloy is an aesthetic plus, but it is also
better than steel that is heavy and rusts.)
White design tires
………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

2. RELIABILITY

Includes at least some or all of the following:

Battery performance
(Quality, saver, durability, amps, capacity, watts, etc.,
this is also a personal safety factor)
Cold climate package
Engine heater
(Helpful in cold climates)
General Professional Opinion
Manufacturer’s Financial Strength
(Week position might mean impaired ability for quality
production and/or to conduct top quality research and
development)
New model
(Usually less reliable)
Number of complaints
(Government and other sources)
Recalls
Relevant mechanical statistics
(Government and other published figures)
Reputation of manufacturer
Workmanship
………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

3. SAFETY

Includes at least some or all of the following:

ABS
(Electronically helps driver retain control under severe braking
conditions)
Air bags, including number and quality
and if vertically employed
(Generally, vertically employed air bags cause less problems.
The more air bags the safer the occupants. Reduced force air bags
[“next generation” or “de-powered”] are safer.)
Anti-roll bar
(Fixed steel bar for crash protection)
Anti-sway bar
(Helps cornering, the thicker the better)
Anti-theft device
(Includes visual and/or audible alarm, starter disable, panic,
key coding, or other security facility, etc.)
ARS
(Accelerated slip control, a positive safety factor, especially on icy
roads)
Automatic dimming mirrors
(By themselves reduce glare)
Automatic headlight washers
(Safety factor in extreme weather conditions)
Battery run-down protection
(Convenient safety factor)
Breaks’ operation/quality
(Incl. 60-0 feet, disc., ventilated, wet pavement, skidding, etc.
[disc brakes are generally better than drum breaks])
Bumper strength
(5 mph, quality, rubber strips, tests, etc.)
Cargo cover
Cargo net
Central locking system
Child safety locks
(Rear doors cannot be opened from inside.)
Crash rating
(U. S. Government figures, etc., analyzed/quantified)
Daylight running lights
(Turns on lights when you start your engine. Safety factor:
other drivers notice you easier. For somewhat similar effect,
use your parking lights when driving during the day.)
Emergency parking break quality, effectiveness
(Such break is independent of the main system.)
ESP (Electronic Stability Program)
(Helps on icy roads)
Firewall (Occupant-protection from engine fire)
First aid kit
Fog lamps (a safety factor)
Front, back and side visibility
(A very important safety factor.)
Fuel tank location/protection (Fire-hazard factor)
Head rests/restraints/adjustable
(An important safety factor, but also an element of
comfort, especially on long trips)
Head up instrument display
(Projects gauge views onto windshield so you don’t have to
take your eyes off the road)
Gas cap lock
Global positioning/navigation system
(For wealthy individuals who get lost easily . . . )
Insurance companies’ ratings
(Indication of risks)
Integrated child seat
(Extra safety for small children)
Keyless entry
(It is not necessarily remote, as it could be a keypad)
Maneuverability
(Safety factor. SUVs are generally less maneuverable than
traditional passenger cars.)
NHTSA and other crash test results
(National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and other
experiments’ analyzed outcomes)
Number and quality of front, side and knee air bags
and seat belts
Occupant injury/death statistics
(All other things being equal, generally size/weight matters
once a crash is inevitable. Our patented and patent pending method compares vehicles
on their respective real-life safety, not whether they are
safe in their own class. Out there, there exist no rules that state that
only vehicles of equal size/weight may crash into one another.
For example, in the majority of accidents, a very small SUV loaded
with expensive safety options is probably no match for a very big
SUV in a crash, even if the much larger vehicle is equipped with less
safety features.)
Parking brake type
Precision Steering
(Safety and comfort)
Rear window washer/wiper
(Safety and convenience in extreme weather conditions.)
Recalls, lawsuits, jury awards, settlements,
government regulation agency complaints.
Roadside assistance program
Rollover protection system, incl. anti roll bar
(SUVs tend to roll over more than ordinary passenger cars)
Safety equipment (overall)
Side air bags
(Very important safety device.)
Side crash protect
(Steel bar, etc.)
Size
(Generally, the bigger vehicle affords more
passenger protection in a crash)
Stabilizer bars
(Safety/comfort advantage.)
Stability control
(Automatically helps correct over- or under-steering on curves)
Sun-visors’ effectiveness, size, quality, ease of operation
Theft frequency rating/risk factor
Traction control
(Important safety factor, reduces speed and/or applies breaks to control
slipping wheels during hazardous road conditions)
Uni-body construction
Weight (curb weight here: the SUV’s weight
without occupants and cargo)
(Generally, in a crash, the heavier car is safer.)
Wheel locks
………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

4. COMFORT (Physical, emotional, and mental)

Includes at least some or all of the following:

Adjustable Suspension Control
(Driver selects per terrain)
Adjustable shock absorbers/ride control
(Driver controls ride: a great but costly option)
Air cleaner
Air condition (type, quality, efficiency,
environmental impact)
Antenna (power, quality, etc.)
Armrests
Automatic climate control
Automatic leveling suspension
(Adjusts springs for heavy loads by itself)
Automatic parking/emergency brake release
Auto seat belts
(Wrap around you by themselves)
Availability of parts
Bucket seats
Built in coin holder
Built in cup holders
(Number and design)
Cargo mat
Cargo tie down hooks
Carpeted trunk
Cassette player
CD player
Chime headlights-on warning
Color keyed exterior decoration
Color matched door edge guards
Compass
Console
(Completeness, operation and accessability)
Cruise control
(More than a convenience on longer trips, it can save gas and
help avoid speeding tickets)
Day/night rearview mirrors
(Convenience and safety)
Digital instrumentation
(A matter of preferences to gauge design: instead of traditional
moving arrows, etc., the relevant state of affairs
is displayed by numbers.)
Door operations
(Ease/comfort, speed sensitive locks, etc.)
Driver side express window
Driver Preferences
(Electronically memorizes seat, mirror, radio, etc. adjustments)
Driving Range
(How far on a full tank)
Dual note horn
(Some safety relevance)
Dual temperature air conditioning
(Useful if your companion’s preferences differ from yours)
Ease of getting in and out
Environmental impact rating concerns
(Emission, etc.)
Ergonomics
(Including long distance driving, seat quality, etc.)
Extra sound deadening
(Insulation: makes for better music listening or quiet . . . )
Facility of general operation
Fold away mirrors
(Useful for smaller garages)
Fuel capacity
Gold emblem
Gold finish exhaust trim
Ground clearance
Halogen headlights
(They are brighter than traditional lamps)
Heated seats
Heated windows
Illuminated entry system
(Quality and effectiveness)
Inside decor, incl. appointments, wood trim,
refinements, luxury, etc.
Inside lights
(Number, brightness, location, convenience, fading, cargo/engine
compartments, ashtray, glove-box, etc.)
Interior and exterior noise
(Including engine disturbance, wind, exhaust, and so on)
Intermittent wipers
Larger engine
(Generally quieter and more powerful)
Leather strapped shifter
Leather wrapped steering wheel
Lift-gate vs. tailgate
(The former is generally safer, more convenient and practical.)
Lift-over
(If lower: it is easier to load heavy objects)
Luggage rack
Lumbar support
(Power, effectiveness, etc.)
Map lights
Map pockets
Mirrors operation and efficiency
Number of dealerships
Number of speakers
On-star navigation system
Outside-temperature display
Parking/emergency brake ease/comfort
Power accessory outlet(s)
Power mirrors
Power steering
(Recirculating ball, variable assist, rack and pinion, etc.)
Power steering cooler
(Added safety.)
Power seats
(Quality, versatility, reliability)
Power trunk/hood/gas-cap/lift-gate
Quality of cooling and heating system
(Power, quickness, reliability, etc.)
Quality/reputation of dealership
Rear defogger/defroster
Rear roof spoiler
Rear seat ventilation
Remote keyless entry
Ride quality
Running boards
(Generally, it is easier to get in and out of an SUV
with running boards)
Sales satisfaction index
Sliding rear window
Sound system quality
Spare tire type
Splash guards
Stainless steel exhaust pipe
(Not just a cosmetic factor, it lasts longer)
Spare tire cover
Sun-moon roof
(Power, etc.)
Suspension
(Types, configurations, ratings, automatic leveling, quality,
comfort, wishbone, wishbone multi-link, control arm, springs,
shocks, absorbers, frame, body, engine, drive train, independent
torsion, anti roll bar, torsion spring, torsion bar, rigid rear axle,
rear leaf spring, road calibrated, etc., for instance wishbone is
more comfortable, independent is generally better, etc.)
Telephone
Telephone slot
Tilt/Telescopic steering wheel
(A positive safety factor, not only comfort.)
Tinted glass
(Privacy factor, shields sun, plus cooler in summer, warmer in
winter, and even protects upholstery.Too dark a tint
applied to the front driver or passenger side mirrors can get
you a traffic ticket though)
Tire speed/quality/capacity/height-weight ratio, etc.
(Tires are rated and represent an important safety factor.)
Trunk cargo organizer
Two driver preferences electronic seat memory system
for seats/mirrors, etc.
Universal garage opener
Vanity mirror(s)
(Lighted)
Variable assist steering
(A plus)
Wheelbase
(Longer and wider mean more comfort and less maneuverability)
………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

5. ROOMINESS

Includes at least some or all of the following:

Cargo space
Glove box
(Quality and size)
Headroom (front and back)
Hip room (front and back)
Leg room (front and back)
Passenger number
Passenger volume (EPA)
Rear folding seats
Seat size
Shoulder room (front and back)
Storage Compartments
………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

6. EXPERTS’ CONSENSUS

Includes at least some or all of the following:

Concordance of overall opinions, ratings and
expressions of buying and decision making guides,
government and independent evaluating services,
magazine and newspaper editorials, professional
organizations, reviewers, automobile designers,
electronic and print media experts, mechanics,
engineers, industry insiders, and so on.

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

7. POPULARITY

Includes at least some or all of the following:

Awards
Please remember that absolutely any SUV can get a gold medal
for something. Read the qualifications!
(To make the point, here is an exaggerated,
humorous example: “SUV X was rated
best-maneuverable among 5’8″ tall
high school drop out male teenagers in Hawaii
in the under $11,000 new foreign made fifth
model year category during the initial 24 hours of
owning the vehicle in tropical weather conditions
in mountainous terrain with a single
5’2″ blonde female passenger aboard.”)
Customer satisfaction ratings
(Researchers usually ask those who already choose a certain SUV
if they are satisfied with it. We do not know a great many important
variables, including for one thing, if these responding owners would
have been more or less satisfied had they chosen different make/models . . . )
Fashionableness
(Few of us admit its true importance.)
How many are sold
(James Thurber said that there is no safety in numbers, or in anything else.
Large sales figures can be a positive indication, unless you feel that
most people can be fooled most of the time . . .)
Rising or falling sales figures
(Reflecting current trends)
…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

8. ECONOMY

Includes at least some or all of the following:

Expected longevity
Insurance premiums, insurance companies’ and Insurance
Institute ratings/scores
Money spent on promotional campaigns
(For this ultimately the buyers pay, yet possibly aside from prestige,
it adds nothing to the SUVs inherent value . . . )
Per mile cost of operation
(PMC includes fuel type, mileage, normal service, maintenance
frequency/cost & other predicted up- keep expenses; expected repair,
parts and labor costs; collision repair rating, etc.)
Quality/length of warranty
(Basic, power-train, rust, etc.)
Resale value
(3 ys/5 ys)